United States Constitution Facts

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. It was drafted in 1787 during the Philadelphia Convention, and ratified by the states in 1788. The Constitution sets out the frame of government of the United States and guarantees certain fundamental rights to its citizens. It replaced the Articles of Confederation, which had served as the country’s governing document since 1781.

The Constitution is divided into seven articles. The first three articles deal with the federal government and its powers. The fourth article sets out the process for amending the Constitution. The fifth article protects the rights of the states. The sixth article establishes the Constitution as the “supreme law of the land.” The seventh article provides for the ratification of the Constitution and the formation of the government under it.

The first article establishes the name of the document and its purpose. The second article outlines the three branches of government—the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. The third article specifies the powers of the federal government and the relationship of the states to the federal government.

The fourth article of the Constitution sets out the amendment process. Amendments may be proposed by the Congress or by a national convention called for by two-thirds of the state legislatures. Amendments ratified by three-fourths of the states become part of the Constitution.

The fifth article of the Constitution protects the rights of the states. It prohibits the federal government from compelling the states to participate in a national military or to surrender their sovereignty. It also guarantees that the states will be treated equally and will not be discriminated against by the federal government.

The sixth article of the Constitution establishes the Constitution as the “supreme law of the land.” This provision ensures that the Constitution will be given priority over any other law and that it will be the final authority on the Constitutionality of laws passed by the government.

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The seventh article of the Constitution provides for the ratification of the Constitution and the formation of the government under it. It requires that nine of the thirteen states ratify the Constitution in order for it to take effect. It also establishes the date by which the Constitution must be ratified.

What are 5 facts about the U.S. Constitution?

The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States. It is the foundation of the United States government and the basis for the country’s laws.

Here are five facts about the U.S. Constitution:

1. The Constitution was written in 1787 and ratified in 1788.

2. The Constitution establishes the three branches of government: the executive branch, the legislative branch, and the judicial branch.

3. The Constitution protects the rights of citizens, including the right to free speech, freedom of assembly, and freedom of religion.

4. The Constitution outlines the process for electing the president and the vice president of the United States.

5. The Constitution can be amended by Congress. Amendments have been added to the Constitution over the years, including the Bill of Rights (the first 10 amendments).

What 3 things did the Constitution?

There are a few things that the Constitution lays out specifically. These three items are the basis of our democracy and have been amended and changed to reflect the growth of our country over time.

The first is the idea of representation. The Constitution states that all legislative power is derived from the people, who will elect representatives to act on their behalf. This ensures that the government is accountable to the people and that the people have a say in how they are governed.

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The second is the system of checks and balances. The Constitution creates a separation of powers between the three branches of government – the executive, legislative, and judicial. This ensures that no one branch has too much power and that no one person can control the government.

The third is the idea of individual rights. The Constitution protects the rights of all individuals, regardless of race, religion, or social status. This guarantees that all Americans are treated equally under the law and have the same opportunities in life.

What is unique about the U.S. Constitution?

The United States Constitution is the highest law of the United States of America. It was ratified on September 17, 1787, and is the oldest written Constitution in use.

The Constitution is unique in a few ways. First, it is a written Constitution. This means that the Constitution is a document that specifically spells out the powers of the government and the rights of the people. It also means that the Constitution can be amended, or changed, if necessary.

Second, the Constitution is a federal Constitution. This means that it establishes a national government, with power divided between the national government and the state governments.

Third, the Constitution is a democratic Constitution. This means that the people are the source of power in the government. The Constitution protects the rights of the people and guarantees that they will have a say in their government.

Who actually wrote the Constitution?

The Constitution of the United States is one of the most important documents in the history of the United States. It is the document that lays out the structure of the government and the rights of the citizens. But who actually wrote the Constitution?

There is no one answer to this question. The Constitution was written by a number of people, including George Washington, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton. These men and others worked together to create a document that would serve the country well.

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The Constitution was written in a time of great change. The United States was a new country, and the founders were trying to create a government that would work well for the country. They wanted a government that was strong and fair, and that would protect the rights of the citizens.

The Constitution has been amended many times over the years, and it has been changed to reflect the needs of the country. But the original document is still an important part of American history.

What are the 7 things of the Constitution?

The Constitution of the United States is a document that lays out the foundation of the government of the United States. It is a lengthy document, and includes many different articles and sections.

One of the most important sections of the Constitution is the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights lays out the rights of citizens of the United States. It includes the right to free speech, the right to bear arms, and the right to a fair trial.

The Constitution also lays out the structure of the government. It establishes the three branches of government – the executive branch, the legislative branch, and the judicial branch.

The Constitution also establishes the rule of law. This means that the government is subject to the law, and that the law is not subject to the government.

The Constitution is a important document, and is the foundation of the United States government.

How old is the U.S. Constitution?

The United States Constitution is 226 years old. It was ratified on September 17, 1787.

Who signed the U.S. Constitution?

On September 17, 1787, the delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed the document that would eventually become the United States Constitution.

The Constitution was signed by a total of 39 delegates, including James Madison, George Washington, and Benjamin Franklin. It was later ratified by the states and went into effect on March 4, 1789.

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